Third Avenue United Church




Third Avenue United Church

Site Information

Country: Canada
State: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Location: 52° 7' 54" N - 106° 39' 35" W
Field Documentation Date(s): To be determined
Project Release Date(s): To be determined
Time Range: 0 BCE - 0 BCE
world map with location

3D Point Cloud of the exterior of Third Avenue Church

Site Description

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Constructed of limestone in Tyndall Gothic style, Third Avenue United Church was the largest stone structure in Saskatoon’s downtown, built of natural stone from its foundation to the top of its two towers. In 1913 it was described as "one of the most architecturally beautiful edifices in Canada. It also contains the largest sanctuary of any church on the prairies and the third largest in Canada. The massive hand painted stained glass windows are 8.2 metres wide at the base and 6.7 at the top and are considered among the largest art installations in the province. Inside the church there is a large Casavant organ with 2,468 pipes, with the real, functioning pipes hidden behind a wall, and an impressive network of oak ceiling beams that support the roof without need for large, obstructing pillars. These architectural features give the sanctuary a unique shape that musicians insist give the building the best acoustics in Saskatoon.
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Construction of the Church

History

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In 1910 the decision to build a new church arose. At this time, the Methodists, later to become the United Church in 1925, worshipped at a more modest building on the corner of 3rd Avenue and 21st Street. Architect J. Semmens was selected to design the church. On May 13th, 1912 the cornerstone was laid by David Lusk, under which a copper time capsule was buried by first mayor James Clinkskill and 1st University of Saskatoon president Dr. Walter Murray. Construction was finished in 1913 on land bought by Temperance Colonization Society. When the church was dedicated on June 29th, 1913,Dr. Walter Murray, President of the University, called it, "the first permanent home of religion in Saskatoon". In 1925 the church was renamed from Third Avenue Methodist Church to the Third Avenue United Church after formation of a united congregation of Methodists. During the 1920s the church was used by CFQC for live broadcasts, including organ recitals. Third Avenue United Church has played host to musical greats such as composer Percy Grainger, pianist Arthur Rubinstein, Duke Ellington, Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, and contemporary pianist Jan Lisiecki.
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Perspective of the Church's Interior from a Birds Eye View

Project Narrative

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This project was the result of partnership between Third Avenue Church, Tourism Saskatoon, Stantec, and CyArk. While collaborations of this nature are common for the Oakland based non-profit, Third Avenue Church became the first site to be completed through CyArk's 2012 Project Donation Partner Program. The Church was scanned in June of 2012 with a FARO Focus scanner and a Leica C10 scanner. Unlike traditional consulting projects, donated projects rely more heavily on partner participation. For Third Avenue Church, the project initiative was headed by Tourism Saskatoon and Third Avenue Church, data collection and post processing were completed by Stantec, and dissemination and archival services were provided by CyArk. With such a successful completion to this project, CyArk looks forward to working with a great number of partners on donated projects in the future.
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Perspective of the Church's Interior from a Birds Eye View

Preservation

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In June 2012, Third Avenue United Church and Tourism Saskatoon partnered with Stantec and the non-profit CyArk to digitally preserve the iconic structure. To achieve this, a team from Stantec scanned the church with terrestrial LiDAR scanners along with conventional survey methods to create an accurate digital reconstruction of the site. Highly detailed photos of the church were also collected. Utilizing all of this data, Cyark created a web portal integrating the highly-accurate laser scan data with a rich collection of documentation, including photographs, video footage, drawings, and historical documents.
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