FAQ

How do you choose projects?
How is CyArk data made available to the public? What do you mean by open access?
How can I help?
How can I become a partner?
Can I get bigger pictures?
Why am I asked to login?
Why do I have to send a fax in order to get an account?
Why can't I see the 3D Models/Point Clouds?
What is the difference between a 3D Model and a 3D Point Cloud
What is a 3D Point Cloud?
What is a 3D Model?
What is a Drawing?
What is a an Elevation?
What is a Plan View Drawing?
What is a Section Drawing?
What is a Panorama?
What is a Perspective?
What is a TruView?
How do I view a TruView?
What is HDR Photography?
How do I find more information about a specific area on your map?
What is "Geo-Referencing"?
I have pictures of a site, how do I upload them?
How can I find news about CyArk?
Why don't you have a certain hazard on the Hazard Map?
Why don't you have a certain project listed on the Hazard Map?
Why is a certain site listed on the Hazard Map, but not on the Projects Page?
Why don't you have a certain site archived?
What is CyArk?
What does your name mean?
When did CyArk start?
How many sites have you done and how many are you going to do?
How is CyArk supported?
How do I get CyArk to fund my project?



How do you choose projects?
CyArk established a CyArk 500 Advisory Council to determine which sites make the CyArk 500 list. The council is guided by seven principles:
(1) Is the site culturally significant and representative?
(2) Is the site at risk from human aggression or environmental danger?
(3) Does our digital preservation method provide unique and compelling value to the site and what are the circumstances under which digital documentation will be beneficial?
(4) Is the site owner/manager agreeable to digital documentation by CyArk?
(5) Does the site represent a geographical region, cultural context, heritage category or historic period that is not now well represented in the CyArk archive?
(6) Will digital preservation of the site stimulate the use of the technology for other sites in the region, or for similar sites elsewhere?
(7) Does the site contribute to the socioeconomic well being of local and stakeholder communities?
CyArk also digitally preserves sites that are local or regional importance. While these sites may not be of universal appeal, they are often very important to the communities that support them
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How is CyArk data made available to the public? What do you mean by open access?
When we digitally preserve site, we usually get a license from the site owner/manager for non-commercial use of the data we collect. This means we can disseminate the information to the public for education purposes for no charge. We nearly always make low resolution point clouds available to the public through our browser-based viewer. The ownership rights to point cloud data are ill defined in many legal systems. Also, many of the site authorities we work wish to control access to the data we collect and we respect these wishes. Often there are security considerations. For this reason, we do not make our 3D data available under a Creative Commons License or similar schema. We also discourage reverse engineering of the data we collect and disseminate on our web site. If you have a non-commercial application for which you would like to use the data we have collected, please contact us directly and we will endeavor to help you.
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How can I help?
There are three ways you can help CyArk: donate, partner, or volunteer. Go to our Get Involved page for more details.
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How can I become a partner?
We have partners in a variety of fields including service providers (photographers, surveyors, etc.), universities and other research organizations and corporations. You can become a partner by going to the Get Involved page and submitting a request. Once the request has been received and approved, they are made official through an MOU (memorandum of understanding) which outlines the terms of the partnership. This can be around a specific project, or based on an exchange of services.
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Can I get bigger pictures?
Full resolution images are available, but they require a professional account. If you do not have an account, and would like to apply, please register.
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Why am I asked to login?
CyArk collects data from a site under a non-commercial license. You are asked to login to protect this data, and the sites we've documented, from commercial use. If you would like to apply for a free account, please visit the register page.
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Why do I have to send a fax in order to get an account?
In order to protect our content from commercial use, we require a signed user license agreement. This is a legal document. As such, we require a physical copy.
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Why can't I see the 3D Models/Point Clouds?
This 3D Viewer is developed using a new technology, WebGL . We also used the Three.js library to aid in development. Because this is such a new technology, you will need to use recent versions of Google Chrome , Mozilla Firefox , or Apple's Safari . Internet Explorer is not supported, however you can install the Chrome Frame plug-in in Internet Explorer with just a few clicks and it will work there as well. We are sorry about this inconvenience, however we highly recommend installing Chrome Frame if you are an IE user.
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What is the difference between a 3D Model and a 3D Point Cloud
The 3D models on our web site are polygon surface models. A point cloud is a set of three dimensional coordinates plus other attributes such as intensity or color.
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What is a 3D Point Cloud?
A 3D Point Cloud is an accurate three-dimensional representation of a site, building, or part of a building composed of individual points which correspond to real-world coordinates measured by a 3D laser scanner. Read the laser scanning article in our technology section for more information on how these points are collected.
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What is a 3D Model?
A 3D Model is a three-dimensional representation of a site, building, or part of building composed of polygons, texture, and shading.
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What is a Drawing?
Architectural drawings include measureable Plans, Sections and Elevations which are created or drawn from laser scan data.
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What is a an Elevation?
In an architectural drawing, an Elevation is a geometrical drawing or projection on a vertical plane showing the external upright parts of a building. Drawings of building walls are made as though the observer is looking straight at the wall.
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What is a Plan View Drawing?
In an architectural drawing, a Plan View Drawing is a floor plan or top view of a horizontal section taken at a distance above the floor, varying so as to cut the walls at a height that which will best show the construction. Such a plan is drawn as though the observer is looking down into the rooms. It is also called a floor plan.
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What is a Section Drawing?
In an architectural drawing, a Section Drawing is a cross-section view of a building showing the details of the construction.
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What is a Panorama?
A Panorama is a collection of photographs which capture an area in 360 degrees. These photos are then "stitched" together to create a seamless, spherical image which can be rotated in real time using a mouse. For more information, go to the Panorama entry on our Technology page.
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What is a Perspective?
A Perspective is a screen shot of a 3D Point Cloud, 3D Models and Digital Reconstructions.
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What is a TruView?
TruView is a proprietary viewer offered by Leica. It is similar to a Panorama in the sense that it takes the perspective of looking outwards from a single point.
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How do I view a TruView?
TruView is available as a browser plugin and can be downloaded here. Currently this plug is in only available for Internet Explorer, so it does not support Firefox or Macs (Mac Firefox or Safari).
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What is HDR Photography?
High Dynamic Range Photography is a set of techniques that allows a greater dynamic range of exposures (the range of values between light and dark areas) than normal digital imaging techniques. This means details that may have been lost in a shadow that was too dark, or a sky that was too light, are visible in the photograph. Please read more on our HDR Technology page
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How do I find more information about a specific area on your map?
There are two ways to do this. If you are on the project map and have already selected that area, simply press the "current area info" button and you will be taken to that area's entry on the Site Information page. You can also navigate directly to this area by selecting the Site Information Page, choosing AREA INFO from the table of contents at the top, and then selecting the area you want
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What is "Geo-Referencing"?
Geo-referencing an object means locating its position in a known coordinate system. On the CyArk website, this means we establish a relation between a piece of multimedia (photograph, movie, elevation, etc.) and a map. If a photo was taken 100 yards south of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, then its multimedia icon is placed on the Piazza del Duomo map 100 yards (to scale) south of the tower.
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I have pictures of a site, how do I upload them?
We do not currently support this via the website. The majority of content on our site was collected with the specific purpose of digital preservation in mind. These photos are different than the typical snapshots. However, if you think you have photos that may be of value to one of our projects, please visit the Get Involved section. By submitting a request we can decide the best course of action.
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How can I find news about CyArk?
The latest news about CyArk will be located on the Community Page of our website. That page isn't currently completed, but will be launched September 10th.
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Why don't you have a certain hazard on the Hazard Map?
The Hazard Map is under constant development. The hazard you're looking for may well be on the way, or it may be that no reliable information on that particular hazard exists.
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Why don't you have a certain project listed on the Hazard Map?
Sites listed on the Hazard Map have been deemed by various organizations to be of cultural value. We are constantly adding sites to the Hazard Map, so if a site is not listed, it doesn't mean we think it unimportant. It's possible we just haven't gotten to it yet.
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Why is a certain site listed on the Hazard Map, but not on the Projects Page?
The Hazard Map is a tool used to help visualize the threats associated with cultural heritage worldwide. Listing sites we have not yet documented not only creates a better research tool, but also reinforces the urgency of documenting cultural heritage.
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Why don't you have a certain site archived?
We only list sites in our project section that are completed and apply to CyArk's mission. If a project is not on our Project Page, either it does not conform to our mission, is not completed, or hasn't even begun.
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What is CyArk?
CyArk is a non-profit entity whose mission is to preserve Cultural Heritage Sites through collecting, archiving and providing open access to data created by laser scanning, digital modeling, and other state-of-the-art technologies. For more information, visit the About Page.
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What does your name mean?
CyArk comes from the combination of the words "cyber" and "archive", a digital safe house for cultural heritage.
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When did CyArk start?
CyArk became an official entity in 2001. Read the full story on our History Page.
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How many sites have you done and how many are you going to do?
We currently have 45 sites completed, with another 50 in various stages of completion. We would love to document the whole world.
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How is CyArk supported?
CyArk is supported by public sector partners including Historic Scotland and the National Park Service, private sector partners including Autodesk, Leica Geosystems, Faro Technologies and Iron Mountain who provide in-kind and cash contributions. CyArk also receives funding from research organizations, foundations, service provider organizations and contributions from the public.
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How do I get CyArk to fund my project?
CyArk rarely funds projects directly. Rather, we work with site authorities and partner with third parties to raise funds.
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